Going To School In Japan

Daughter in School in JapanHello,

My wife and kids have been in Japan for the past few weeks visiting relatives, and we decided to enroll our daughter (a.k.a. “Princess”) into the local elementary school for a week. We were unsure whether she would fit in because she’s never been to school in Japan, and although she’s fluent in Japanese, her reading/writing skills are a little bit behind. Thanks to distance-learning courses though, she has kept up with the Japanese education system well enough and she has had a great time in school so far.

Some half-Japanese kids living overseas might not have many opportunities to learn Japanese, so the school interviewed her a couple weeks early to determine her language skills, and we were relieved to see that she was fine. She wouldn’t need a translator or anything. Plus, she already had her own Randoseru (ランドセル) backpack her grandparents gave her a couple years ago.1

Elementary schools in Japan don’t have a cafeteria. Instead, children have meals provided in the class called kyūshoku (給食), which are usually nice quality meals. No tater-tots or pizza-bread. 😉 Parents have to pay for these meals, of course. Since she’s only in school a week, we paid a week’s worth. Also, unlike older kids, elementary school kids do not have strict uniforms, but do wear things like yellow-hats or something to help identify them as a student at that school. In this photo my daughter isn’t wearing her hat though.

Also, we were worried that because she is different she might have problems interacting with other kids at school, but we are relieved that she made friends right away. The original photo here shows my daughter with two other little girls. They like to play afterschool and such. It makes us so happy to see this.

At one point, we had plans to live and work in Japan someday, but we were worried about keeping our kids in public Japanese schools.2 Although we abandoned these plans for a few reasons (space, cost of living, etc), it’s nice to know that it’s still an option. Now, kids like my daughter may have issues over the long-term though, such as this young lady, but at least we know it’s possible. Next year, we might let her attend school longer.

More importantly, we’re just happy to see our daughter having this special opportunity and making new friends in the process. 🙂

P.S. In case you’re wondering, Japanese schools start in April and ends in March or so. While there are seasonal breaks, there is no two month-long summer break like in the US. So, her school in the US is on summer break, but her school in Japan is not. Thanks to reader Tokyo5 for the clarification here. 🙂

1 She’s used it in American schools, but one problem is that American papers use the US Letter size (8½ x 11″) standard, while Japan uses A4 standard (8.27 × 11.7″). In practical terms, this means that her American papers and binders are a bit too wide for her backpack and get bent. So, we finally switched to an American backpack instead. We liked the Randoseru a lot, but we had no choice. :-/

Also, the color, as you can see, is light purple. Originally randoseru backpacks were red and black only, but lately there is more variety for kids to choose from. 🙂

2 International school students in Japan seem to be isolated and don’t always learn enough Japanese language and manners to successfully thrive as an adult. Plus they’re super-expensive.

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Author: Doug

A fellow who dwells upon the Pale Blue Dot who spends his days obsessing over things like Buddhism, KPop music, foreign languages, BSD UNIX and science fiction.

7 thoughts on “Going To School In Japan”

  1. Japanese schools do have summer vacation. It’s shorter than in America and it’s not the end of the school year … it’s the end of the first tri-mester.
    It starts next week or so, and goes til end of August.

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    1. Oh right, Obon Yasumi correct? I should probably amend that. I knew of Obon Yasumi but didn’t count it as summer vacation, but then again, it’s worth calling out anyway. Thanks for the suggestion.

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      1. Not obon. Obon is about a week, usually mid-August. That’s the summer break most working adults have … in schools though, there is “natsu-yasumi” (summer vacation)- as well as fuyu-yasumi (winter break) and haru-yasumi (spring break) at the end of the school year.

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  2. Yeah, that’s right. In Japanese schools, even elementary school, kids have homework during these breaks (summer, winter and spring). In junior high and high school, they have the homework and after-school “club” (baseball, band, etc) practice almost everyday.

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