Stay Flexible

Something interesting that I recently stumbled upon from the famous 12th-century Japanese text, Essays in Idleness, which I talked about at length here.

211) We cannot trust in anything.  The foolish man places great trust in things, and this sometimes leads to bitterness and anger.

If you have power, do not trust in it; powerful men are the first to fall.  You may have many possessions, but they are not to be depended on; they are easily lost in a moment.  Nor should you trust in your learning if you have any; even Confucius was not was not favored by this times.  You may have virtue, but you must not rely on it; even Yen Hui1 was unlucky.  Do not trust the favor of your lord; his punishment may strike before you know it.  You cannot depend on your servants either; they will disobey you and run away.  Nor should you trust in another person’s kind feelings; they will certainly change.  Do not rely on promises; it is rare for people to be sincere.

If you neither yourself nor in others, you will rejoice when things go well, but bear no resentment when they go badly.  You will then have room on either side to expand and not be constrained.  With nothing too close before or behind you, you will not be blocked.  When a man is cramped for space, he is broken and crushed.  When the activity of the mind is constricted and rigid, a man will come into collision with things at every turn and be harmed by disputes.  If you have space for maneuvering and are flexible, not one hair will be harmed.

Man is the most miraculous of creatures within heaven and earth.  Heaven and earth are boundless.  Why should man’s nature be dissimilar?  When it is generous and unconstrained, joy and anger cannot hamper it, and it remains unaffected by externals.

–translation by Prof. Donald Keene

Compare this with one of the sutras in the Pali Canon, such as the Kakacupama Sutta (MN 21) or the Lokavipatti Sutta (AN 8.6) also mentioned here.

1 Yen Hui, or Yan Hui, was Confucius’s most treasured disciple. He was very poor, but virtuous and dedicated. He died at a young age due to disease. Confucius lamented his loss often in the Analects.  More on Confucius many disciples here.

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Author: Doug

A fellow who dwells upon the Pale Blue Dot who spends his days obsessing over things like Buddhism, KPop music, foreign languages, BSD UNIX and science fiction.

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