No Curse Whatsoever

Another excerpt from the famous 12th-century Japanese text, the Essays in Idlessness (see here for details):

When they were leveling the ground to build the Kameyama palace, they came on a mound where a huge number of snakes were coiled together.  They decided that these snakes were the gods of the place and reported it to His Majesty [the Emperor].  He asked, “what should be done about it?” People all said, “these snakes have occupied the place since ancient times.  It would be wrong to root them up recklessly.”  But the prime minister said, “what curse would creatures dwelling on imperial property place on the site of a new place? Supernatural beings are without malice; they will surely not wreak any punishment. We should get rid of the snakes.” The workmen destroyed the mound and released the snakes into the Ōi River. No curse whatsoever resulted.

–translation by Prof Donald Keene

Superstition has its troubles.

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Author: Doug

A fellow who dwells upon the Pale Blue Dot who spends his days obsessing over things like Buddhism, KPop music, foreign languages, BSD UNIX and science fiction.

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