Remembering the Civil War

Plaque

“Reunited – One Country Again and One Country Forever.
–President McKinley, Atlanta, Dec 15th 1898

Let no one deceive another
or despise anyone anywhere,
or through anger or irritation
wish for another to suffer.
— The Metta Sutta, translation by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu

A few years ago I had a business trip in Tennessee and visited the nearby Chickamauga National Military Park in northern Georgia.

Unlike the statues that glorify the antebellum South and the Confederacy, the war museum focused on a spirit of reconciliation and highlighting the horrors of war because the Battle of Chickamauga was incredibly bloody even by standards of that war. A lot of young men died that didn’t need to.

A lot of the Confederacy statues that exist now and are subject to controversy were erected decades after the Civil War, often during a revivalist movement in the 1910’s and 1920’s, which not coincidentally was also one of the most overtly racist periods in American history. The 1920’s had many race massacres and extra-judicial lynchings and the Jim Crow laws had reached their peak.1 There is a definite connection between those statues and the horrors of post-WWI racial discourse.

It’s important to remember the Civil War and the South but for the right reasons, not the wrong ones. The Chickamauga Museum shows how reconciliation and respect for the sanctity of life is much more admirable than war heroes who represented and dying and dubious cause.

Civil War monument

If people wish to remember the Civil War (and we should) it’s important that they ask themselves why they are doing it?  By this they are truly known.

The Buddha strongly warned against divisiveness: divisive speech, factionalism, and so on.  Buddhism is all about harmony.  You don’t have to necessarily like other people, but in following the Eightfold Path, particularly Right Intention, you also give up any ill-will or intention to harm them.  It’s also the spirit of the Metta Sutta quoted above.

Reconciliation and harmony are much more powerful and beneficial in the long-run than divisiveness and elevating one group at the expense of others.  In the famous Dhammapada the Buddha said:

5. Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal.

6. There are those who do not realize that one day we all must die. But those who do realize this settle their quarrels.

If we wish to uphold any ideals, this is the ideal we should uphold.

P.S.  Speaking of the power of reconciliation (sorry for reposting this again Facebook followers).

1 Somewhat tangentially related, but definitely read about the Harlem Hellfighters of WWI. This was the famous, decorated all-black regiment that fought in the trenches of France, but faced unjust conditions at home.

Happy Birthday, Shakyamuni Buddha!

Hello Dear Readers,

April 8th, according to the Solar Calendar, marks the birth of the historical Buddha, known by Buddhists as Shakyamuni Buddha or “the Buddha of the Shakya clan”.  For folks who follow Chinese, Korean or Vietnamese Buddhism, the Buddha’s birthday falls on different dates according to the lunar calendar.

This video is just a brief overview of the Buddha’s Birthday in the Mahayana tradition and how can appreciate the life of the Buddha.

Enjoy and wishing you warm celebrations!

Doug

P.S. More on the baby Buddha as the lone, world-honored one

Ohanami: Cherry Blossom Viewing

Recently the family and I took a visit to the University of Washington to view the Japanese cherry-blossoms or sakura (桜).  This is a tradition in Japan called ohanami (お花見) which just literally means “flower viewing”.

We missed last year’s viewing due to bad weather,¹ so were happy to view them this year, especially since Little Guy is now old enough to kind of understand.  At the very least, the kids could get some fresh air.  🙂

Here are some photos of our visit:

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My daughter took a few photos too:

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…and she snuck in a photo of me and her little brother:

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Happy Spring, everyone!

P.S. Past ohanami at the UW and in Japan.

Girls’ Day 2017 Wrap-Up

Hey Folks,

Just wanted to post a few pictures from our Girls’ Day celebration at home.  This is another doll set that Little Guy made in his Japanese preschool:

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Here is the sakura-mochi we had.  Lately, it’s been harder to find it around here, even at Asian-food markets, so we were happy to find this one.  It was delicious as usual.  I enjoy sakura-mochi once a year, but like the Thanksgiving turkey, or Christmas treats, it’s worth the wait.

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My wife also made a nice clam soup.  I can’t recall what kind of clams these are, but usually we get Manilla clams.  The small colored balls are fu, which are dried wheat balls (naturally colored) that expand in water.  The soup itself is made from shira-dashi, which is like a clarified fish broth (dashi).

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Finally the piece-de-resistance: a large plate of chirashi.  Chirashi is basically sushi rice garnished with sashimi and such.  This is mostly maguro tuna, egg, shrimp, and some boiled spinach on the side.  The rice itself is mixed with shiitake mushrooms and such.

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We played lots of karuta games with my daughter.  The particular game we played was a karuta game based on famous Japanese yojijukugo phrases.  Since neither my daughter nor I am that familiar with them, my wife read the cards for us, while we found the right cards to match.  My daughter won most games, though not without some serious competition.  😉

All in all, it was a great Girls’ Day and looking forward to Easter and Children’s Day next.