Happy Children’s Day 2018

May 5th in Japan is traditionally Children’s Day or kodomo no hi (子供の日). Although originally it was “Boy’s Day” in ancient times as a counterpart to Girl’s Day on March 3rd, it has broadened over the years to include all children.

Families still assemble displays of armor like so to wish for their sons’ success in life, but also people hang special windsocks that look like Japanese koi fish called koinobori (鯉のぼり 🎏) among other things. Children also enjoy kashiwochi which is a kind of sweet rice pastry wrapped in leaves of the White Oak tree.

The leaves are very tough and chewy, so make sure to unwrap those before eating. 😉

So to all children everywhere, Happy Children’s Day!!

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No Curse Whatsoever

Another excerpt from the famous 12th-century Japanese text, the Essays in Idlessness (see here for details):

When they were leveling the ground to build the Kameyama palace, they came on a mound where a huge number of snakes were coiled together.  They decided that these snakes were the gods of the place and reported it to His Majesty [the Emperor].  He asked, “what should be done about it?” People all said, “these snakes have occupied the place since ancient times.  It would be wrong to root them up recklessly.”  But the prime minister said, “what curse would creatures dwelling on imperial property place on the site of a new place? Supernatural beings are without malice; they will surely not wreak any punishment. We should get rid of the snakes.” The workmen destroyed the mound and released the snakes into the Ōi River. No curse whatsoever resulted.

–translation by Prof Donald Keene

Superstition has its troubles.

Stay Flexible

Something interesting that I recently stumbled upon from the famous 12th-century Japanese text, Essays in Idleness, which I talked about at length here.

211) We cannot trust in anything.  The foolish man places great trust in things, and this sometimes leads to bitterness and anger.

If you have power, do not trust in it; powerful men are the first to fall.  You may have many possessions, but they are not to be depended on; they are easily lost in a moment.  Nor should you trust in your learning if you have any; even Confucius was not was not favored by this times.  You may have virtue, but you must not rely on it; even Yen Hui1 was unlucky.  Do not trust the favor of your lord; his punishment may strike before you know it.  You cannot depend on your servants either; they will disobey you and run away.  Nor should you trust in another person’s kind feelings; they will certainly change.  Do not rely on promises; it is rare for people to be sincere.

If you neither yourself nor in others, you will rejoice when things go well, but bear no resentment when they go badly.  You will then have room on either side to expand and not be constrained.  With nothing too close before or behind you, you will not be blocked.  When a man is cramped for space, he is broken and crushed.  When the activity of the mind is constricted and rigid, a man will come into collision with things at every turn and be harmed by disputes.  If you have space for maneuvering and are flexible, not one hair will be harmed.

Man is the most miraculous of creatures within heaven and earth.  Heaven and earth are boundless.  Why should man’s nature be dissimilar?  When it is generous and unconstrained, joy and anger cannot hamper it, and it remains unaffected by externals.

–translation by Prof. Donald Keene

Compare this with one of the sutras in the Pali Canon, such as the Kakacupama Sutta (MN 21) or the Lokavipatti Sutta (AN 8.6) also mentioned here.

1 Yen Hui, or Yan Hui, was Confucius’s most treasured disciple. He was very poor, but virtuous and dedicated. He died at a young age due to disease. Confucius lamented his loss often in the Analects.  More on Confucius many disciples here.

Happy 2018

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Dear Readers,

Happy New Year! 2017 had been a good year overall, and I am looking forward to 2018. We had a good time for New Year’s, too. Folks might remember a recent post where I talked about Japanese New Year or oshōgatsu.

I wanted to briefly share a few things that happened for New Year’s.

First, my daughter “Princess” celebrated her birthday just after Christmas and just before New Year. She is no longer a little girl, but has grown up into a fine, intelligent young lady. We are very proud. She enjoyed her birthday with friends, got to have a makeover at a health spa, and got her ears pierced.

New Year’s Eve itself, Ōmisoka, was tons of preparation followed by tons of food brought by friends:

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We watched the yearly special on Japanese TV, Kōhaku Uta Gassen, but I was so busy playing with all the kids, I missed most of it. Plus, my favorite act, Golden Bomber, was not on, so there wasn’t much motivation to watch it. Amazingly though, we did manage to stay up until midnight (unlike past years).

Just in the nick of time we also enjoyed toshi-koshi soba:

Toshi-koshi soba

Finally came New Year’s Day itself. We all woke up late that morning, but we still managed to have a traditional Japanese New Year’s breakfast:

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The white and orange thing in the middle is a kagami-mochi, which is a kind of display for New Year, the same way a Cornucopia is used for Thanksgiving in the US. Inside the kagami-mochi is a real mochi rice-cake though, so on the 11th, you can open it and use it for soup and such.

Other foods shown here are associated in some way with good luck or something auspicious. For example, the baked snapper fish (or “tai” in Japanese) is associated with gratitude/joy which is medetai. And other such things like that.

Finally, we did hatsumōde, or first temple visit of the year, at the usual Shingon-Buddhist temple. More on that in a later post, since this year is a “yakudoshi” year for me! 😮

On the 2nd, I took that day off too, and spent some time visiting my grandmother, who lives in a nursing home. My kids were happy to see their great-grandmother too. We had a great time together, and then the family and I did a bit of shopping for the kids and went home and relaxed for the first time in probably 2 months.

Anyhow, hope you all had a great New Year’s Day too!

Getting Ready for Japanese New Year

Hi all,

The month of Shiwasu is coming to an end and now it’s time for Japanese New Year!  Japanese New Year, or oshōgatsu (お正月), originally coincided with the Chinese lunar calendar and thus coincided with “new year” events in China, Korea and Vietnam.  However, with the reforms in the Meiji Period (1868-1912), the solar calendar was adopted, and everything shifted accordingly.1

If I were to describe Japanese New Year, I would say it’s like Thanksgiving and Christmas combined.  It has lots of winter traditions like Christmas, and has lots of good food and gifts for the kids, and lasts 3 days.  It’s something the whole family can enjoy together without all the fuss of holiday shopping.  In another sense, it’s very different than Thanksgiving and Christmas because the traditions have evolved from a different culture.

Still, it is one of my favorite times of the year, so with all the Christmas hullabaloo out of the way, we can ease into Oshogatsu and celebrate the end of the year.

Typically at our home, we celebrate New Year’s Eve (Ōmisoka 大晦日) by watching the yearly Japanese music special Kōhaku Uta Gassen, and my wife making toshi-koshi soba. The term toshi-koshi (年越し) means something like “crossing the year” and is a special kind soba-noodle soup people eat only on New Year’s Eve night. Since I am not exactly young anymore, I don’t really stay up for the whole Kohaku special, plus my favorite groups usually show up in the first half anyway, but I usually stay up long enough to enjoy the soba.

On New Year’s day, we enjoy some kind of osechi-ryōri (お節料理), which is a special kind of New Year’s platter that includes a lot of traditionally “auspicious” foods. When the kids were younger2 and we used to spend New Year’s in Japan, the osechi would be pretty elaborate and we’d be eating for 3 days. Inevitably, some of the food gets picked over, and kind of goes to waste, and since there’s only 4 of us to celebrate here in the US, we usually make our osechi much smaller and finish it by the second day.

Finally, there is the tradition of Hatsumōde. This is the first visit of the year to a Buddhist temple or Shinto shrine. Both religions have co-existed in Japan for many centuries (not always easily), and so they’ve influenced one another to the point that it’s not always easy to tell the difference at first glance. For many people in Japan, the tradition of Hatsumode might be one of the few times of the year they visit a temple/shrine3 and is a time to solicit a blessing for the rest of the year.

We typically go to a certain Shingon-Buddhist temple that is fairly removed from our house for hatsumode even though we rarely ever go during the rest of the year. None of us are particularly inclined toward esoteric Buddhism (we are even less inclined toward Shinto religion), and it is pretty far from our house, but it’s one of the few temples in the area that does a proper hatsumode service and isn’t clingy.4

Anyhow, that’s Oshogatsu in a nutshell. I will be posted more soon. Stay tuned!

1 Buddhist holidays in Japan also shifted similarly, hence they don’t coincide anymore with same holidays in mainland Asia.

2 With our kids being older and enrolled in school here in the US, it’s easier to visit in the summer. Either way, airfare to Japan is super expensive for both times of year. I would love to travel during Spring or Autumn, but haven’t done so in many years.

3 Just as many families in the West might only visit Church for certain holidays.

4 Japanese temples in the US can be either clingy due to lack of community, or so Westernized that they don’t follow any Japanese traditions. Or they just don’t cater to family (i.e. Zen temples). Hard to find a proper “family” Japanese temple for this reason.

Korean Woodblock Prints in Japan

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A while back I had talked about Buddhist texts in Japan and Korea and in particular wood-block printing. Wood-block printing of Buddhist texts, rather than copying by hand, predates printing in the West by centuries and, in particular, Korean Buddhist temples had developed a refined approach that is still preserved in temples like Haein-sa among others.

While visiting the temple of Kawasaki Daishi in Japan, the family and I took a trip to the sutra room there, and that was when I saw this photo above. It seems that the Jogye Order in Korea has lent a woodblock used for printing the Heart Sutra to Japan, along with an example print of the Heart Sutra (the Chinese writing on the right-hand side of the plaque).

In fact, the woodblock above does bear resemblance to the ones at Haein-sa, based on this photo on Wikipedia.  It’s not clear which temple this block came from, but it would be interesting if it really did come from Haein-sa.  Of all the temples I would like to visit in Korea, Haein-sa happens to be very high on my list.

Anyhow, it was really neat to see this first-hand.